And it is my Nothing

A shocking introduction indeed, Richey qua Winston Smith. I hate purity. Hate goodness. I don’t want virtue to exist anywhere. I want everyone to be corrupt to the bones. Julia: ‘Well then, I ought to suit you, dear. I’m corrupt to the bones.’ But in this context, hating purity is not the same as loving…

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I Know I Believe in Nothing

Writing can be too difficult at times, and I find myself presently unable to write down my thoughts on the Manics as musician-philosophers to my liking (which I began, here). I don’t remember which Manics song I heard first, but it was either ‘Faster’ or ‘If you tolerate this, then your children will be next’.…

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Ethics and Theme Development

I’m the support manager for a company called Organic Themes. We create and sell WordPress (.com and .org) themes, which are targeted towards ‘artists, businesses and blogs’. I’m also a developer, though I haven’t produced much by way of original work – I’ve mostly customized existing themes. What is the relation between ethics and theme…

Music and the Aesthetic

In my previous post I used the word ‘aesthetic’, which ordinarily might mean something like ‘the beautiful’. Art in its various forms are aesthetic creations: paintings for the eyes, music for the ears, and so on. We also hold to aesthetic ideals: ideas of beauty, architecture, writing, oration, and so forth. When I use the word ‘aesthetic’ I have these things in mind, but also something else. My use includes what in the Kierkegaardian literature is referred to as an ‘existence sphere’. The spheres are three stages of individual existence, roughly: the aesthetic stage, the ethical stage, and the religious…

Musicians: Our Popular Philosophers

I recall hearing someone say that musicians are the popular philosophers of our day. The ‘popular’ was probably meant pejoratively, i.e. musicians are the sophists of our day. Surely such a judgment is only possible on a musician-by-musician (or band-by-band, or…) basis, but it does raise a number of interesting questions: who is a musician, and to what extend does manufacturing influence our judgment? When does music become a message, become philosophy? How can an aesthetic medium bring its audience beyond the aesthetic, and what judgment(s) can we make about the musician who revels in the aesthetic? What of the…

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Gregory of Nazianzus: A Teleological Argument

Gregory of Nazianzus’ Second Theological Oration contains a teleological argument – though I’m not sure he would have called it that – that would be familiar to readers of William Paley. Gregory begins with a problem: we are not able to conceive of God, so in what sense can we be said to consider God?…